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  • #243183

    In reply to: Post Your Desktop!

    Nearly Halloween…and up comes the Disney villains Halloween wallpaper on my laptops 😂. This one is my favourite as it also includes some lesser-known Disney villains that Disney seems to keep “forgetting” about such as Chernabog from ‘Fantasia’ and Judge Frollo from ‘The Hunchback of Notre-Dame’. I wish the Horned King (voiced excellently by John Hurt) from ‘The Black Cauldron’ was on it too as he’s another one that Disney seem to keep making up excuses for “forgetting” about 😑…

    Desktop

    #242947

    Legatus, I agree with that, outside of trying to learn Greek or Latin or Hebrew or something for example. Oh, I forgot to mention the Simpsons. Love those Halloween episodes. Audie, I don’t know about Erased, I know very little about anime. I probably should check it out.

     

    #242355
    comicsgate
    Premium

    SKYNET (a Terminator fan film by Chris .R. Notarile)

    55 years after Judgment Day, the war is over….. We lost. Now, the last man on earth will finally come face to face with the program that drove mankind to extinction- SKYNET.

    A WORD FROM CHRIS

    It’s pretty safe to say that the Terminator franchise has gotten stale. The fact that there are literally THREE, count em, THREE part 3’s, and a part 4/prequel, and none of them managed to capture the creative spark of the first two films, speaks volumes. As a life long fan, I just got tired of it all. I’m tired of the pointless retcons, the paper thin excuses for when Judgment day now will take place, the endless amount of disbelief that needs to be suspended to keep roping in Arnold Schwarzenegger, and the never ending, yet continually unfulfilled promise of a “new” trilogy. Terminator has become about as complicated as the Halloween franchise, and that is not something to be proud of.

    In 2007, before Rob Zombie gave us his…. “version” of Halloween, I decided to put the final nail in the coffin of the Michael Myers we all came to know and love. I killed him in a short film called THE LAST HALLOWEEN : THE DEATH OF MICHAEL MYERS. By that point, in 2007, Halloween had become a very messed up franchise, with multiple sequels ignoring each other. It was stupid, contrived, and I hated it. And since 2002’s HALLOWEEN : RESURRECTION ended with the promise of an unmade Halloween 9, I wanted to just kill off Michael for good. And I did.

    I went into SKYNET with the exact same mindset. I wanted to terminate the franchise. My goals were simple- fix what was broken, then end it, leaving no way for the story to continue. Now I know what you might be thinking- Skynet is technically still alive at the end of the short. Yeah, but it is a paradox. It knows it cannot allow itself to be created again. So it will either just exist entirely on its own, much like DARK FATE’S Carl did- a relic of a dead timeline, or it will find a way to self terminate. Either way, my version of Skynet has learned its lesson, so I guarantee it will either behave, or find a way to physically terminate itself. But its days of enslaving humanity are long behind it.

    After I had written the script, I immediately went into casting….. Then Covid hit, and the entire project was put on hold. But in so many ways, it was for the best. Originally, the story was actually set in 2029 with a 45 year old John Connor. But the actor I originally approached for the part (someone I often collaborated with) kinda fell out of touch with me. Disappointed, but refusing to kill the project, I began thinking who else could play the part? Personally, there is no bigger honor than when fans of the franchise consider my work canon. It’s the best compliment I could ever ask for. So I thought to myself, what is the best way to get someone to consider my little short canon? The most obvious answer was to get someone from the original franchise to guest star or cameo. But who? And then I thought to myself- what about Michael Edwards? What’s he up to? So I straight up emailed him and asked if he’d be interested in the part. I was not only shocked that he replied, but to know he was eager to do it was as awesome as it was validating.

    After a few video calls, I quickly retooled the script to fit Michael’s current age and demeanor. This was going to be the John Connor we’ve always wanted to see. The great military leader from the future war, with the guy who originated the part. What was he like? How has 55 years of unending war treated John? Short answer- not very well.

    Michael and I spoke for about 6-8 months via email and text as we tried to figure out how to film during a pandemic. We both agreed to just put the whole thing off till Covid got more under control. Thankfully the vaccine finally came out in early 2021, and as soon as Michael got his shot, we began prepping to film.

    We shot all his scenes in one day at the Abandoned Zoo in Griffith Park, Los Angeles. Filming was tough because we had to constantly hold for sound interruptions from endless amounts of noisy hikers. But thankfully, we got it all done. Laura Van Yck played the role of Skynet. Some will probably ask, why is Skynet a woman? The answer is simple- I work with a ton of incredibly talented women. I would be a fool not to use them whenever I can. And aside from her amazing talent and beauty, Laura also has a wonderful Belgium accent, which I was more than happy to incorporate. Especially since everybody was cool with the T-800 being from Austria.

    SKYNET was a labor of love. Part LOGAN and part BLADE RUNNER. I wanted to tell a thoughtful, heartfelt story about two mortal enemies finally seeing eye to eye, and then finding a way to make the wrong things right. This is not a shoot em up action blockbuster. This is the end. The finale we never got, but have always wanted. Hopefully someone in Hollywood is taking notes.

    #241295

    Well, with Halloween a month away, and the forth wave now hitting hard, tis time to resurrect this song.

    #240875

    MERRY CHRISTMAS

    Biblical History:
    Christmas (or Feast of the Nativity) is a celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ, on December 25, The gospels of Luke and Matthew describe Jesus as being born in Bethlehem to the Joseph and Mary who traveled from Nazareth to Bethlehem for the Roman census, Jesus is born there and laid in a manger.

     

    The traditional Christmas story can be found in “The King James Bible”                Matthew (1) verse (17 through 25) the Conception and News to Jesus earthly father Joseph.

    The news to Mary can be found in Luke (1) verse (26 through 56)
    “The Nativity of Jesus”, in the New Testament Luke (2) verse (1 through 39) says that Jesus was born in Bethlehem, in accordance with prophecies. When Joseph and Mary arrived in the city, the inn had no room and so they were offered a stable where the Christ Child was soon born, with angels proclaiming this news
    The shepherds Story Matthew (2) verse (1 through 12) who then further spread the information.

    The Power of Christmas and Proof of its spirit:

     

    During World War 1, 100,000+ British and German troops informally agreed on a cease fire on the Western Front. The two armies placed candles on their trenches and on Christmas trees, then continued to celebrate by singing Christmas carols.

     

    Soon soldiers started slowly and tentatively started making excursions across No Man’s Land, where small gifts were exchanged, such as food, tobacco, alcohol and souvenirs, such as buttons and hats. No mans land for those who have never heard of it is where all the artillery, rifles, pistols, machine guns and all forms of Death and Destruction man could think of was deployed. You would surely die if you entered it. It was known as Hell on Earth or The Devils Playground as well.

    Some letters to back this up can be found as proof of the above.
    Bruce Bairnsfather wrote

     

    I wouldn’t have missed that unique and weird Christmas Day for anything. I spotted a German officer, some sort of lieutenant I should think, and being a bit of a collector, I intimated to him that I had taken a fancy to some of his buttons. I brought out my wire clippers and, with a few deft snips, removed a couple of his buttons and put them in my pocket. I then gave him two of mine in exchange. The last I saw was one of my machine gunners, who was a bit of an amateur hairdresser in civil life, cutting the unnaturally long hair of a docile Boche, who was patiently kneeling on the ground whilst the automatic clippers crept up the back of his neck.

    Henry Williamson a nineteen-year-old private in the London Rifle Brigade

     

    Dear Mother, I am writing from the trenches. It is 11 o’clock in the morning. Beside me is a coke fire, opposite me a ‘dug-out’ (wet) with straw in it. The ground is sloppy in the actual trench, but frozen elsewhere. In my mouth is a pipe presented by the Princess Mary. In the pipe is tobacco. Of course, you say. But wait. In the pipe is German tobacco. Haha, you say, from a prisoner or found in a captured trench. Oh dear, no! From a German soldier. Yes a live German soldier from his own trench. Yesterday the British & Germans met & shook hands in the Ground between the trenches, & exchanged souvenirs, & shook hands. Yes, all day Xmas day, and as I write. Marvelous, isn’t it?

    Captain Robert Miles, King’s Shropshire Light Infantry.

     

    Friday (Christmas Day). We are having the most extraordinary Christmas Day imaginable. A sort of unarranged and quite unauthorized but perfectly understood and scrupulously observed truce exists between us and our friends in front. The funny thing is it only seems to exist in this part of the battle line – on our right and left we can all hear them firing away as cheerfully as ever. The thing started last night – a bitter cold night, with white frost – soon after dusk when the Germans started shouting ‘Merry Christmas, Englishmen’ to us. Of course our fellows shouted back and presently large numbers of both sides had left their trenches, unarmed, and met in the debatable, shot-riddled, no man’s land between the lines. Here the agreement – all on their own – came to be made that we should not fire at each other until after midnight tonight. The men were all fraternizing in the middle (we naturally did not allow them too close to our line) and swapped cigarettes and lies in the utmost good fellowship. Not a shot was fired all night.

    There are many more stories like this.

    Timeline:

    221: Sextus Julius Africanus gave March 25 as the day of the conception of Jesus in his universal history.

    274: Emperor Aurelian, who instituted the holiday of the Dies Natalis Solis Invicti, did so partly as an attempt to give a pagan significance to a date already important for Christians in Rome.
    336: Earliest known Christmas celebration took place in Rome.

    800: Charlemagne was crowned Emperor on Christmas Day in.
    1066: King William I of England was crowned on Christmas Day.
    1233: The first enacting of The Nativity of Jesus Christ (theatrical play)

    1377: King Richard II of England hosted the first known Christmas feast.
    1607: King James I insisted that a play be acted on Christmas night and that the court indulge in games.

    1629: John Milton wrote: “On the Morning of Christ’s Nativity”

    1743: German Protestant Paul Ernst Jablonski argued Christmas was placed on December 25 to correspond with the Roman solar holiday
    1784: Deck the Halls” was wrote

    1822: Clement Clarke Moore wrote “A Visit From St. Nicholas” More commonly known as: Twas the Night Before Christmas.

    1843: Charles Dickenson wrote “A Christmas Carol”

    1857: Jingle Bells” was copyrighted

    1870: Christmas was formally declared a United States federal holiday on June 28.

    1923: First “National Christmas Tree” in the United States was lit.

     

     

     

    By the Traditions (dates for decorations)

    Lights
    Traditionally, lights were lit on the first day of Advent (11-29-2020) as these lights were actually candles on the Tree. For obvious reasons you would not have been able to earlier than this date as you would not have a tree up.

    Christmas Lights May be put up the 1st or 2nd week of November on Streets and Houses. (November 7 or 14, 2020) and turned on. NOTE: Nothing denoting the words “Christ or Christmas” should be placed out until after “Thanksgiving Day” to not detract from that holiday. Explained in more detain below.
    There are conflicting reports where the dates to put up exterior decorations arise, general agreement is between the above two dates from dates of public displays and caroling as far back as the 1700’s.
    “Note” Private persons installing large displays remember lighting of the full display by tradition is still the 7th of 14th of November.
    Decorations are Removed on either the last day of Advent which is January 6th or the last day of “Candlemas” which is February 2nd.
    The oldest known United States “Public” display is the Pasadena California “Christmas Tree Lane display”
    Interior and exterior Decorations are truly a family event. But Wreath, Mantel and Stockings need to be observed for a traditional Christmas.

     

    Christmas Colors:

    The traditional colors of Christmas decorations are red, green, and gold.
    Red symbolizes the blood of Jesus, which was shed in his crucifixion.
    Green symbolizes eternal life, and in particular the evergreen tree, which does not lose its leaves in the winter.
    Gold is the first color associated with Christmas, as one of the three gifts of the Wise men.

    Wreaths the confusion begins

    Fall Wreaths may be put up the Weekend before the first day of Fall to bring in the season. September 22nd 2020

    Thanksgiving wreaths “wreaths with the words Thanksgiving” Can be added to a Fall wreath the weekend before Thanksgiving but must be removed the weekend after thanksgiving November 21th 2020 to November 29th 2020.

    Winter Wreaths aka Christmas Wreath is put up. The Monday after Thanksgiving, November 30th 2020 though Winter actually starts December 21st.

    The wreaths denote the time of year not the actual holiday, the Seasonal Wreath takes precedent over the singular day/holiday.

     

    You may also have a Winter Wreaths up in November prior to Thanksgiving so long as it does not specifically denote Christmas “I.E. Merry Christmas or Santa Clause on it”. Though it is highly suggested to use fall wreaths.

    If you are confused just remember Nothing denoting by symbol or word of “Christmas” until after Thanksgiving.

    The denotation is to show respect to each of the Holidays /religious Holidays individually of the fall season (Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas).

     

    Mantel Decorations

    Mantel decor should follow wreath tradition, with the exception of stockings which should only be hung the night before (Christmas Eve) in houses with small children. Without Children they may go up with the wreath, however if parties are had prior to Christmas Eve and children are to be present the stocking should be removed while they are present (excluding Christmas Eve)

    TREE

    Trees should be <Live, by tradition, but of other material now for people with health conditions> and should be up not sooner than 4 weeks before Christmas as with proper care they can live that long without high fire chance. Imitation trees should respect tradition time line. (2020 that date is November 27th)

    Lighting of the Tree

    Tree lighting goes back to the 1500’s Germany with the Lighting of it Martin Luther Credited for it with candles in the midish 1500’s>

     

    In the U.S. Tree and Lighting 1830’s Pennsylvania by Germanic Settlers

     

    Lighting with Electricity Thomas Edison made the first Christmas Light String in 1882

     

    First “National Christmas Tree” 1923 Lighting of it was Christmas Eve, with the invent in later years of the Christmas Pageant and other events it was moved back to where it is today though it fluctuates a little.

     

    Perhaps the Humble and yet Powerful Christmas tree of all times was the 1931 Rockefeller tree. Not the one we all think of today but according to many recounts a group of construction workers building the Rockefeller Center put one up on their site either first week or early second week of December it had no Ornaments or lights as the depression was in full swing. But as people passed by by Christmas eve the tiny humble tree had many made of whatever people had and Carrols were sung the Christmas eve.

    When to put out Presents:
    This is one of the best questions, and there is now answer!
    Some put the out as they are bought.

    Others put them out as they are wrapped.

    Still some put them out only on Christmas eve.

    While those with Dogs get up before the kids and put them out before the kids get up and then stay with them protecting them from dog attacks.

    Cat lovers know anything with Paper or shiny will encourage the cats to shred them, and as they have boxes under the wrapping, we know where you will find the cat.

    Parents with young kids will hide them in the strangest places until all are asleep.

    Yet there is also the tradition of families going to family houses and the need to explain on Christmas eve how Santa already arrived.

    The bottom line is, there is no rule no set time, for me though seeing them under the tree brings great joy and happiness, so I put them out the day the tree goes up if I have them and then add to them as the season goes on and as the elves deliver them early as Santa uses us Parents to help him early as he brings Only The Most Important of Gifts himself on Christmas Eve.

     

    Traditions:
    12 days of Christmas:
    Day 1 (25th December): Christmas Day A Partridge in a Pear Tree

    Day 2 (26th December): Two Turtle Doves

    Day 3 (27th December): Three French Hens

    Day 4 (28th December): Four Calling/Collie Birds

    Day 5 (29th December): Five Golden Rings

    Day 6 (30th December): Six Geese-a-Laying

    Day 7 (31st December): Seven Swans-a-Swimming

    Day 8 (1st January): Eight Maids-a-Milking

    Day 9 (2nd January): Nine Ladies Dancing

    Day 10 (3rd January): Ten Lords-a-Leaping

    Day 11 (4th January): Eleven Pipers Piping

    Day 12 (5thJanuary): Twelve Drummers Drumming
    Note: 2019 cost to give your love the 12 days of Christmas was almost $40,000.00

     

     

    Yule Log:

    Burning the Yule log dates back to earlier solstice celebrations and the tradition of bonfires. The Christmas practice calls for burning a portion of the log each evening until Twelfth Night (January 6).

     

    The Nativity scene:

    1.    St. Francis of Assisi is credited with creating the first nativity scene in a small town in Italy on Christmas in the year 1223.
    Center the Christ child Center the manger, or the trough that the Christ child sleeps in, in the stable. On Christmas morning, put the Christ child in the manger.

    2.        Place Mary and Joseph on either side of the manger. Usually Mary is the closest. Joseph should be placed standing above Mary only if his hand is on her.

    3.        Set the secondary characters in concentric circles Set the shepherds and the wise men in concentric circles around the stable. As the wise men were thought to be the last to arrive, put them the furthest away in the nativity scene.

    4.        Arrangement of the animals, in the nativity scene. Place the sheep with shepherds, the Camels with the wise men “But must be placedwell outside as they are <unclean>”,

    5.        DO NOT ever place “unclean animals in or near the Nativity. Leviticus (4) verse (4 through 8) and Deuteronomy (14). They should also (excluding the Camel as it was part of the original birth) be excluded from ALL Christmas Displays in respect for the Jewish religion and the laws surrounding the faith of the family of Jesus at the time of his birth.
    Jesus did later remove this law in Mark 7:19. But at his birth this was still the law.

    6.        Put the angels on the roof (if possible) if not they should be in a manor to show them looking over the Baby Jesus, around the family inside the stable, where they can bring glad tidings and great joy to both the holy family and the viewers of your scene.

    7.    The Star should at all times be centers above baby Jesus either inside and above him in the Nativity or above the center of the roof above the angles on the roof.

     

     

    Classic Holiday TV and Movie shows.

    ·       “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving”

    ·       Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade

    ·       “Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town”

    ·       “Frosty the Snowman”

    ·       “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas”

    ·       “Rudolph the Red-Nose Reindeer”

    ·       “A Charlie Brown Christmas”

    ·       “The year without Santa”

    ·       “Little Drummer boy”

    ·       “The Nutcraker”

    ·       “A Christmas Carol”

    ·       “It’s a Wonderful Life”

    ·       “Miracle on 34th Street”

    ·       “A White Christmas”

    ·       “White Christmas”

    Modern Holiday Tv and Movie shows

    These will probably become classics

    ·       The Santa Clause (1, 2, and 3)

    ·       Gremlins

    ·       Nightmare Before Christmas

    ·       Home Alone

    ·       Christmas Vacation

    ·       A Christmas Story

    ·       Jingle all the Way

    ·       Scrooged

    ·       The Polar Express

    ·       ELF

     

    Elf Deaths

    No, An Elf does not die when you decorate in November Children, People just say that because of the fact that retail stores are putting the stuff out sooner annoying people.

     

    People need to follow the Traditional times for putting things up and FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, JESUS, THE SPIRIT, SANTA and the Little Pigmies down in New Guinea …… TAKE THEM DOWN ON TIME!!!!!!!! Do not be that guy who leaves them up year-round.

    And Finally:
    DIE-HARD is NOT a Christmas Movie! Here is why.

    1. Release date: Jul 20, 1988 (Nowhere near Christmas)
    2. It could be set on any other Holliday of the year and be the same movie.
    Seriously is Con-Air an Easter Movie because It had a Bunny? Nope
    3. The office holiday party? Really what Company would ever have a office party Christmas eve? Try-hard.

    4. Murder and Theft, RPG’s and Machine guns are in no way Christmas related. Not exactly things that promote Peace and Goodwill toward mankind.

    5. Where the is the Dinner table scene, or Santa a Family gathering in joy and happiness.

    6. The only time we see anything Santa related is on a dead man. Ya that really brings out the feelings of peace on earth goodwill toward mankind. But hey McClain did get his present a Machine Gun.

    7.The most famous line in the movie in NO WAY is Christmas, Maybe in a Wild west movie ok but Not Christmas.

    8. Where are the kids, Seriously from Miracle on 34th to Peanuts they have kids in them making you feel good or warming your heart.
    9. His wife’s name is Holly? Another “try-hard” attempt

    10. Christmas Songs played? Ya and then throw the blood and booms over them “keep trying harder”

    11. Don’t give me the excuse he is willing to sacrifice himself for everyone. We are told about his reputation and it wouldn’t matter if this was Christmas or 4th of July he would still do it as would most cops. So just stop “try-hardering”
    12. It snows at the end? LMFAO I was born and raised in Southern California and never heard of it snowing in LA, I had to actually go look it up at the National Weather Service and the answer was 1962. So Just no no no.
    13. The screen-write for it says it is. Ya and they also say other things we know are not true, but I won’t go off on PC debate here. But in full disclosure “Bruce Willis” himself said it was not. So, we have a difference of opinion between the writer and the star.

     

    Yet the debate will go on forever. It’s a great show but not a Christmas show, the pure fact it has to try so hard to tell you it is, shows you it is not. Christmas shows do not need to try-hard to be one.

    However to be a Christmas movie by tradition: It is released in the Holiday season November and December, It has direct connection to Christmas “without having to try to make the connection”. They drive home the message of Family and Togetherness. Most involve a more secular redemption while others have shadows of a more religious theme connected to grace and redemption. They also have in Christmas films, Santa Clause relation or the story of Santa somehow “Like Tim Allen becoming Santa.

    So Merry Christmas to All, God Bless and may peace and joy fill you in this season, perhaps a little more this season then in past years as I think in 2020 we all need more Peace and Joy and especially Love.

    #240869

    Happy Halloween

    1

    Halloween, and why we celebrate it:
    The history of Halloween has goes back to ancient religious and spiritual traditions that have evolved over time. Samhain (pronounced “sow-win”). Celts celebrated this holiday right around the end of October into early November because it was halfway between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice to celebrate the harvest season as well as the “dark half” of the year “Winter”. This is also when they honored deceased ancestors providing offerings to departed spirits.

    As Catholicism spread, the Catholic church twisted many pagan holidays like Samhain to make them religion-friendly, so they could gain more followers and thus more power. The Catholic All Saints’ Day, which remembers saints and martyrs, is on November 1, and All Souls’ Day, which honors the faithful departed, is November 2 two holidays that have to do with death and the afterlife. The night before All Saints’ Day is called All Hallow’s Eve.

    Hatbox Halloween

     

    History of Halloween timeline

    100 BC: Ancient Celts celebrate Samhain with bonfires, feasts, and offerings to the souls of the dead.
    731 to 41: Catholic influence spreads to pagan holidays like Samhain. Pope Gregory III names November 1 All Saints’ Day.

    835: All Hallows’ Day was officially switched to 1 November
    1000 AD: The Church names November 2 All Souls’ Day; October 31 evolves into All Hallows’ Eve, creating a three-night religious celebration in Europe.

    1500’s: This involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food
    1800s: Irish and Scottish immigrants migrate to the United States, bringing the tradition.
    1900s: Halloween becomes popular for the teenage crowd, with high schools and rotary clubs throwing parties.
    1950s: Suburbanization and the end of WWII sugar rations causes candy production, specifically for Halloween, to blow up; trick-or-treating as we know it today begins to emerge.

    1958: First lady Mamie Eisenhower decorated the White House for Halloween for the first-time in.

    2

     

    History of Halloween tradition #1: Ghosts and spirits

    Samhain, which is the end of the harvest season, is also the Celtic new year, the end of the summer and the beginning of the dark and deadly season of winter. At this time, the Celts believed, the veil between life and death was at its thinnest, and spirits may travel between the two worlds.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #2: Trick-or-treating

    During Samhain, the Celts offered food as a way to ward off evil spirits. In the Middle Ages on the eve of All Saints’ Day, the poor would go “souling,” visiting houses and offering prayers for the family’s dead in exchange for food, called “soul cakes.”

     

    History of Halloween tradition #3: Dressing in costume

    To protect themselves from the potentially evil spirits that may appear during Samhain, the Celts wore animal skin costumes to hide in plain sight. If they looked like a fellow spirit, they believed, it would be safe to go outside.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #4: Bobbing for apples

    Not surprisingly, one of the most time-honored Halloween party games centered around the classic fruit of harvest time, the apple, a symbol of fertility that features in many fortune-telling activities. One variation of bobbing for apples purports that whoever can grab the apple with their teeth will marry first; other versions have the apples marked with initials, indicating a successful bobbers’ future mate. The apple tradition may also have some roots in the Roman harvest festival celebrating Pomona, the goddess of fruit and orchards.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #5: Carving pumpkins

    While today’s jack-o-lanterns tend to lean towards comical, when it comes to the history of Halloween traditions like this one, there’s a good mix of spooky in the story. According to the original Irish legend, Stingy Jack tried to cheat the devil out of his soul. But when Jack died, heaven didn’t want him either, so the devil cursed him to roam the earth using a carved-out turnip as a lantern. A tradition began of carving scary faces into turnips, beets, or potatoes and putting them in the window to scare away “Jack of the Lantern” and other spirits.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #6: Candles

    Flickering flames are no doubt associated with jack-o-lanterns, but the origin of fire’s role in Halloween goes back to Samhain yet again. As part of the ancient festival, a large bonfire would be lit to ward off spirits and lead them to the afterlife. The Celts would then light their hearth fires for the winter from the sacred bonfire.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #7: Haunted houses

    In 1930s America, created haunted houses in basements and old buildings began as another means of keeping kids out of mischief. The popularity of Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion, which opened in 1969, revealed the money-making power of the haunted house; the civic organization the Junior Chamber, also known as the Jaycees, then began using them as a fundraising effort. Today haunted houses and hayrides abound with major attractions such as California’s Knott’s Berry Farm known nationwide and part of a $300 million industry.

    Halloween Decorating Tradition.

    The first weekend following the first day of Fall, is the earliest a person should start decorating for Halloween. The exclusion is to permanently affixed attractions at theme parks.

    If a person is using a wreath to denote Halloween then (NO) Fall, Winter or Christmas wreaths should be up or visible.

    Orange and black are The Official Halloween colors. Orange symbolizes the fall harvest while black symbolizes death.

    Halloween lights come down the weekend after Halloween. But are turned off from midnight Halloween until they are put away.

     

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    #240868

    @Legatus_Legionis Made a good post on the meme of Christmas, I thought I would go ahead and post the timelines I made about the seasons so here they come. Please keep this thread non-political and in the nature of the season, even when debating die-hard. :)

    Happy Halloween

     

     

     

    Halloween, and why we celebrate it:
    The history of Halloween has goes back to ancient religious and spiritual traditions that have evolved over time. Samhain (pronounced “sow-win”). Celts celebrated this holiday right around the end of October into early November because it was halfway between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice to celebrate the harvest season as well as the “dark half” of the year “Winter”. This is also when they honored deceased ancestors providing offerings to departed spirits.

    As Catholicism spread, the Catholic church twisted many pagan holidays like Samhain to make them religion-friendly, so they could gain more followers and thus more power. The Catholic All Saints’ Day, which remembers saints and martyrs, is on November 1, and All Souls’ Day, which honors the faithful departed, is November 2 two holidays that have to do with death and the afterlife. The night before All Saints’ Day is called All Hallow’s Eve.

     

     

    History of Halloween timeline

    100 BC: Ancient Celts celebrate Samhain with bonfires, feasts, and offerings to the souls of the dead.
    731 to 41: Catholic influence spreads to pagan holidays like Samhain. Pope Gregory III names November 1 All Saints’ Day.

    835: All Hallows’ Day was officially switched to 1 November
    1000 AD: The Church names November 2 All Souls’ Day; October 31 evolves into All Hallows’ Eve, creating a three-night religious celebration in Europe.

    1500’s: This involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food
    1800s: Irish and Scottish immigrants migrate to the United States, bringing the tradition.
    1900s: Halloween becomes popular for the teenage crowd, with high schools and rotary clubs throwing parties.
    1950s: Suburbanization and the end of WWII sugar rations causes candy production, specifically for Halloween, to blow up; trick-or-treating as we know it today begins to emerge.

    1958: First lady Mamie Eisenhower decorated the White House for Halloween for the first-time in.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #1: Ghosts and spirits

    Samhain, which is the end of the harvest season, is also the Celtic new year, the end of the summer and the beginning of the dark and deadly season of winter. At this time, the Celts believed, the veil between life and death was at its thinnest, and spirits may travel between the two worlds.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #2: Trick-or-treating

    During Samhain, the Celts offered food as a way to ward off evil spirits. In the Middle Ages on the eve of All Saints’ Day, the poor would go “souling,” visiting houses and offering prayers for the family’s dead in exchange for food, called “soul cakes.”

     

    History of Halloween tradition #3: Dressing in costume

    To protect themselves from the potentially evil spirits that may appear during Samhain, the Celts wore animal skin costumes to hide in plain sight. If they looked like a fellow spirit, they believed, it would be safe to go outside.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #4: Bobbing for apples

    Not surprisingly, one of the most time-honored Halloween party games centered around the classic fruit of harvest time, the apple, a symbol of fertility that features in many fortune-telling activities. One variation of bobbing for apples purports that whoever can grab the apple with their teeth will marry first; other versions have the apples marked with initials, indicating a successful bobbers’ future mate. The apple tradition may also have some roots in the Roman harvest festival celebrating Pomona, the goddess of fruit and orchards.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #5: Carving pumpkins

    While today’s jack-o-lanterns tend to lean towards comical, when it comes to the history of Halloween traditions like this one, there’s a good mix of spooky in the story. According to the original Irish legend, Stingy Jack tried to cheat the devil out of his soul. But when Jack died, heaven didn’t want him either, so the devil cursed him to roam the earth using a carved-out turnip as a lantern. A tradition began of carving scary faces into turnips, beets, or potatoes and putting them in the window to scare away “Jack of the Lantern” and other spirits.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #6: Candles

    Flickering flames are no doubt associated with jack-o-lanterns, but the origin of fire’s role in Halloween goes back to Samhain yet again. As part of the ancient festival, a large bonfire would be lit to ward off spirits and lead them to the afterlife. The Celts would then light their hearth fires for the winter from the sacred bonfire.

     

     

    History of Halloween tradition #7: Haunted houses

    In 1930s America, created haunted houses in basements and old buildings began as another means of keeping kids out of mischief. The popularity of Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion, which opened in 1969, revealed the money-making power of the haunted house; the civic organization the Junior Chamber, also known as the Jaycees, then began using them as a fundraising effort. Today haunted houses and hayrides abound with major attractions such as California’s Knott’s Berry Farm known nationwide and part of a $300 million industry.

    Halloween Decorating Tradition.

    The first weekend following the first day of Fall, is the earliest a person should start decorating for Halloween. The exclusion is to permanently affixed attractions at theme parks.

    If a person is using a wreath to denote Halloween then (NO) Fall, Winter or Christmas wreaths should be up or visible.

    Orange and black are The Official Halloween colors. Orange symbolizes the fall harvest while black symbolizes death.

    Halloween lights come down the weekend after Halloween. But are turned off from midnight Halloween until they are put away.

    • This topic was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by Mustangride1.
    • This topic was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by Mustangride1.
    #240867

    In reply to: Christmas Memes

    Ok
    Official decorating times if you want them.

    Sept 1st Fall can go up though the 18th is the weekend before official fall, anytime after 9.1.21 is acceptable for FALL decorations

    Halloween typically goes up no earlier than 3 weeks before excluding large displays which can start as early as needed to put them up, but should not be illuminated or Animated until 3 weeks prior and arguably 1 week to 10 days, excluding Fairs, Haunted House etc.

    Fall should remain up even through Halloween and is the transition point to Winter. Halloween needs to be down the weekend after Halloween. Fall stays up and the addition of Thanksgiving and even Winter decoration Nov-13th to 20th this year  (nothing denoting Christmas or Santa) until after Thanksgiving day.

    Actual Christmas decorations (denoting Christmas/santa) can go up as I said the 13th of Nov this year, these are for Outside decorations. Indoor should follow the same time lines, but inside is up to the person.

    I have entire articles on these I wrote. Might need to post them in General. Topics.

    #240860

    In reply to: Christmas Memes

    I posted this because I am starting to see Christmas items for sale.

    And the fact on the September Labour Day long Weekend, I saw some people had started putting out Halloween Displays!

    Shocking!

    #240627

    In reply to: ABOVE AVERAGE BANANA

    banana-costume-halloween-funny-gift-mens-t-shirt

    #240624

    In reply to: ABOVE AVERAGE BANANA

    Banana-Costume-Halloween-Shirt-hoodie

    #237945

    <p style=”text-align: center;”>Dc. I havent read much image aside from saga and a few others. I love all classic dc characters. My favorite dc animated movie is new frontier, thats some classic superhwro right there and i love it.</p>
    Favorite comic is a series that connects but not really. Batman year one, long halloween, and dark victory. I also very much enjoyed identity crisis. I know thats kindadivisivebut i liked it. My first comic was from my then sisters bf now husband it was spiderman daredevil two of four marvel knights. Looking the cover it has no other title but its them two above ny buildings in dd and spiderman pose like flying thru the city like they do.

    #234649

    Hello, I have recently come into the hobby of collecting comic books. Out of all comic book characters however, Batman has always and will always be my favorite. There has however been many eras and timelines where the caped crusader has donned his cape. So it can be quite difficult and intimidating to get into reading pretty much any  DC or Marvel character (it was for me at least). The one era of DC comics that did catch my eye was the ‘modern era’. This time in DC ran from the event ‘Crisis on Infinite Earth’ until the ‘Flashpoint’ story arch, which brought in the new 52. Finding a reading order for Batman during this time was a very daunting and time consuming task as DC hasn’t released an official timeline unlike they have for their other timelines. So, I have taken it upon myself to bring to you a solid batman timeline for the ‘Modern Era’. Some of the timeline could be wrong and if I’m missing anything it would be a massive help if you could leave a comment. :)

    (If the story has slashes next to it (/) then it is a cross over event with the justice league)

    Two main sources:

    UBC – Home (weebly.com)

    A comprehensive look at the reading order of Batman Part 1! – YouTube

    Batman: year one
    Batman: Shaman
    Batman and the Monster men
    Batman and the Mad Monk
    Batman: The Man Who Laughs
    Batman: Dark Knight Detective vol. 1
    Batman: Four of a Kind
    Batman: Venom
    Batman: Tenses
    Batman: Prey
    Batman Collected Legends of the Dark Knight
    Batman: Other Realms
    Batman: Gothic
    Batman: Going Sane
    Batman: Night Cries
    Batman: Monsters
    Batman: Terror
    Batman: Dark Legends
    Batman: Snow
    Batman: Mr Freeze
    Batman: Year Two
    Batman: Haunted Knight
    Batman: The Long Halloween
    Batman: Dark Victory
    Batman: Arkham: A serious house on a serious earth
    Batman: Fortunate Son
    Batman: Tales of the Demon
    Batman: Faces
    Batman: Batgirl
    Batman: Ten Nights of the Beast
    Batman: Second Chances
    Batman: The Caped Crusader vol. 1
    Batman: The Cult
    Batman: The Killing Joke
    Batman: A Death In The Family
    Batman: A Lonely Place Of Dying
    Batman: The Caped Crusader vol. 2
    Batman: The Dark Knight Detective vol. 2
    Batman: The Caped Crusader vol. 3
    Batman: The Dark Knight Detective vol. 3
    Batman: The Caped Crusader Vol. 4
    Batman: The Caped Crusader vol. 5
    Batman: The Many Deaths of Batman
    Batman: Blind Justice
    Batman: The Last Arkham
    Penguin: Triumphant
    Azrael: Fallen Angel
    Batman: Prelude to Knightfall
    Batman: Knightfall vol. 1
    Batman: Knightfall vol. 2
    Batman: Knightquest vol. 1
    Batman: Knightquest vol. 2
    Batman: Knightquest: the Search
    Batman: Knightsend
    Batman: Prodigal
    Batman Troika
    Batman: Zero Hour
    Batman: Mitefall
    The Joker: Devil’s Advocate
    Batman: By Doug Moench and Kelly Jones vol. 1
    Tails of the Batman: J.H. Williams III
    Batman: Contagion
    Batman: Legacy vol. 1
    Batman: Legacy vol .2
    Batman: By Doug Moench and Kelly Jones vol. 2
    Batman: Riddler
    Batman: Two-Face
    Batman: Bane
    Batman: Poison Ivy
    Batman: The Abduction
    Batman: Dreamland
    Batman: The Scottish Connection
    Batman: Anarchy
    Batman: The Dark Knight Detective vol. 4
    Grant Morrison: DC 1,000,000////////////////////
    Batman Road to no Man’s Land Omnibus (collects ‘Cataclysm’, ‘Road to no Mans Land’ parts 1 and 2)
    Batman No Mans Land Omnibus vol. 1 (collects ‘No Mans Land’ parts 1 and 2)
    Batman No Mans Land Omnibus vol. 2 (collects ‘No Mans Land’ parts 3 and 4)
    Batman: Harley Quinn
    Batman: By Ed Brubaker vol. 1
    Our Worlds At War / // // ////// /////////
    Batman: The Dark Knight Detective vol. 5
    Batman: Evolution
    Batman: Turning Points
    Batman/Scarface: A Psychodrama
    Harley Quinn: Preludes and Knock Knock Jokes
    Batman: New Gotham vol. 1
    Batman: Officer down
    Batman: False Faces
    Batman: New Gotham vol. 2
    Batman: Gotham County Line
    Batman: The Joker’s Last Laugh
    Batman: By Ed Brubaker vol. 2
    Batman: Bruce Wayne Murderer
    Batman: Bruce Wayne Fugitive
    Batman/Nightwing: Bloodborne
    Gotham Central: In the Line of Duty
    Gotham Central: Half a Life
    Gotham Central: Unresolved Targets
    Gotham Central: The Quick and Dead
    Gotham Central: Dead Robin
    Batman in Barcelona: Dragons Knight
    Arkham Asylum: Living Hell
    Batman: Deaths and the Maidens
    Batman: Hush
    Batman/Poison Ivy: Cast Shadows
    Batman: Broken City
    Batman: as the Crow Flies
    Batman: War Drums
    Batman: War Games: Outbreak
    Batman War Games: Tides
    Batman War Games: Endgame
    Batman War Games: Epilogue
    Batman: Hush Returns
    Identity Crisis/////////
    Batman: War Crimes
    Batman: Under the Red Hood
    Batman: City of Crime
    Infinite Crisis/////////////////////
    52////////////////////
    Batman/Two-Face: Face The Face
    Crisis Aftermath: The Specter//////////////
    Batman: Detective
    Batman: Death and the City
    Batman: Jokers Asylum
    Batman: Gotham Underground
    Batman: Imposters
    Batman: Batman And Son
    Batman: Son of the Demon
    Batman: Bride of the Demon
    Batman: Birth of the Demon
    Batman: The Resurrection of Ra’s Al Ghul
    Batman: Private Casebook
    Batman: The Black Glove
    Batman: Heart of Hush
    Batman: Black Casebook
    Batman R.I.P
    Final Crisis//////////////////////
    Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader
    Batman: Battle for the Cowl
    Batman: Battle for the Cowl Companion
    Batman: Long Shadows
    Batman: Streets of Gotham: Hush Money
    Batman: Streets of Gotham: Leviathan
    Batman: Life after Death
    Blackest Night////////////////////////////
    Batman: The Streets of Gotham: The House of Hush
    Batman: Arkham Reborn
    Batman and Robin: Batman Reborn
    Batman and Robin: Batman vs Robin
    Batman: Time and the Batman
    Batman: The Black Mirror
    Batman: Eye of the Beholder
    Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne
    Batman: Bruce Wayne: The Road Home
    Batman And Robin: Batman Must Die
    Batman: Gotham Shall be Judged
    Batman and Robin: Dark Knight vs White Knight
    Batman: Knight and Squire
    Batman: Gates of Gotham
    Batman: The Dark Knight: Golden Dawn
    Batman: Incorporated
    Batman: Leviathan Strikes
    FlashPoint///////////////

    I will also Be making reading orders for other members of the ‘Bat Family’.

    #234546

    Hello, I have recently come into the hobby of collecting comic books. Out of all comic book characters however, Batman has always and will always be my favorite. There has however been many eras and timelines where the caped crusader has donned his cape. So it can be quite difficult and intimidating to get into reading pretty much any  DC or Marvel character (it was for me at least). The one era of DC comics that did catch my eye was the ‘modern era’. This time in DC ran from the event ‘Crisis on Infinite Earth’ until the ‘Flashpoint’ story arch, which brought in the new 52. Finding a reading order for Batman during this time was a very daunting and time consuming task as DC hasn’t released an official timeline unlike they have for their other timelines. So, I have taken it upon myself to bring to you a solid batman timeline for the ‘Modern Era’. Some of the timeline could be wrong and if I’m missing anything it would be a massive help if you could leave a comment. :)

    (If the story has slashes next to it (/) then it is a cross over event with the justice league)

    Two main sources:

    UBC – Home (weebly.com)

    A comprehensive look at the reading order of Batman Part 1! – YouTube

    Batman: year one
    Batman: Shaman
    Batman and the Monster men
    Batman and the Mad Monk
    Batman: The Man Who Laughs
    Batman: Dark Knight Detective vol. 1
    Batman: Four of a Kind
    Batman: Venom
    Batman: Tenses
    Batman: Prey
    Batman Collected Legends of the Dark Knight
    Batman: Other Realms
    Batman: Gothic
    Batman: Going Sane
    Batman: Night Cries
    Batman: Monsters
    Batman: Terror
    Batman: Dark Legends
    Batman: Snow
    Batman: Mr Freeze
    Batman: Year Two
    Batman: Haunted Knight
    Batman: The Long Halloween
    Batman: Dark Victory
    Batman: Arkham: A serious house on a serious earth
    Batman: Fortunate Son
    Batman: Tales of the Demon
    Batman: Faces
    Batman: Batgirl
    Batman: Ten Nights of the Beast
    Batman: Second Chances
    Batman: The Caped Crusader vol. 1
    Batman: The Cult
    Batman: The Killing Joke
    Batman: A Death In The Family
    Batman: A Lonely Place Of Dying
    Batman: The Caped Crusader vol. 2
    Batman: The Dark Knight Detective vol. 2
    Batman: The Caped Crusader vol. 3
    Batman: The Dark Knight Detective vol. 3
    Batman: The Caped Crusader Vol. 4
    Batman: The Caped Crusader vol. 5
    Batman: The Many Deaths of Batman
    Batman: Blind Justice
    Batman: The Last Arkham
    Penguin: Triumphant
    Azrael: Fallen Angel
    Batman: Prelude to Knightfall
    Batman: Knightfall vol. 1
    Batman: Knightfall vol. 2
    Batman: Knightquest vol. 1
    Batman: Knightquest vol. 2
    Batman: Knightquest: the Search
    Batman: Knightsend
    Batman: Prodigal
    Batman Troika
    Batman: Zero Hour
    Batman: Mitefall
    The Joker: Devil’s Advocate
    Batman: By Doug Moench and Kelly Jones vol. 1
    Tails of the Batman: J.H. Williams III
    Batman: Contagion
    Batman: Legacy vol. 1
    Batman: Legacy vol .2
    Batman: By Doug Moench and Kelly Jones vol. 2
    Batman: Riddler
    Batman: Two-Face
    Batman: Bane
    Batman: Poison Ivy
    Batman: The Abduction
    Batman: Dreamland
    Batman: The Scottish Connection
    Batman: Anarchy
    Batman: The Dark Knight Detective vol. 4
    Grant Morrison: DC 1,000,000////////////////////
    Batman Road to no Man’s Land Omnibus (collects ‘Cataclysm’, ‘Road to no Mans Land’ parts 1 and 2)
    Batman No Mans Land Omnibus vol. 1 (collects ‘No Mans Land’ parts 1 and 2)
    Batman No Mans Land Omnibus vol. 2 (collects ‘No Mans Land’ parts 3 and 4)
    Batman: Harley Quinn
    Batman: By Ed Brubaker vol. 1
    Our Worlds At War / // // ////// /////////
    Batman: The Dark Knight Detective vol. 5
    Batman: Evolution
    Batman: Turning Points
    Batman/Scarface: A Psychodrama
    Harley Quinn: Preludes and Knock Knock Jokes
    Batman: New Gotham vol. 1
    Batman: Officer down
    Batman: False Faces
    Batman: New Gotham vol. 2
    Batman: Gotham County Line
    Batman: The Joker’s Last Laugh
    Batman: By Ed Brubaker vol. 2
    Batman: Bruce Wayne Murderer
    Batman: Bruce Wayne Fugitive
    Batman/Nightwing: Bloodborne
    Gotham Central: In the Line of Duty
    Gotham Central: Half a Life
    Gotham Central: Unresolved Targets
    Gotham Central: The Quick and Dead
    Gotham Central: Dead Robin
    Batman in Barcelona: Dragons Knight
    Arkham Asylum: Living Hell
    Batman: Deaths and the Maidens
    Batman: Hush
    Batman/Poison Ivy: Cast Shadows
    Batman: Broken City
    Batman: as the Crow Flies
    Batman: War Drums
    Batman: War Games: Outbreak
    Batman War Games: Tides
    Batman War Games: Endgame
    Batman War Games: Epilogue
    Batman: Hush Returns
    Identity Crisis/////////
    Batman: War Crimes
    Batman: Under the Red Hood
    Batman: City of Crime
    Infinite Crisis/////////////////////
    52////////////////////
    Batman/Two-Face: Face The Face
    Crisis Aftermath: The Specter//////////////
    Batman: Detective
    Batman: Death and the City
    Batman: Jokers Asylum
    Batman: Gotham Underground
    Batman: Imposters
    Batman: Batman And Son
    Batman: Son of the Demon
    Batman: Bride of the Demon
    Batman: Birth of the Demon
    Batman: The Resurrection of Ra’s Al Ghul
    Batman: Private Casebook
    Batman: The Black Glove
    Batman: Heart of Hush
    Batman: Black Casebook
    Batman R.I.P
    Final Crisis//////////////////////
    Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader
    Batman: Battle for the Cowl
    Batman: Battle for the Cowl Companion
    Batman: Long Shadows
    Batman: Streets of Gotham: Hush Money
    Batman: Streets of Gotham: Leviathan
    Batman: Life after Death
    Blackest Night////////////////////////////
    Batman: The Streets of Gotham: The House of Hush
    Batman: Arkham Reborn
    Batman and Robin: Batman Reborn
    Batman and Robin: Batman vs Robin
    Batman: Time and the Batman
    Batman: The Black Mirror
    Batman: Eye of the Beholder
    Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne
    Batman: Bruce Wayne: The Road Home
    Batman And Robin: Batman Must Die
    Batman: Gotham Shall be Judged
    Batman and Robin: Dark Knight vs White Knight
    Batman: Knight and Squire
    Batman: Gates of Gotham
    Batman: The Dark Knight: Golden Dawn
    Batman: Incorporated
    Batman: Leviathan Strikes
    FlashPoint///////////////

    I will also Be making reading orders for other members of the ‘Bat Family’.

    #233293

    Batman (1989) and Batman Returns are two of my favorite superhero movies, so of course I choose those.

    Also, I try to maintain a tradition of watching The Nightmare Before Christmas and Beetlejuice every Halloween.

    I haven’t seen Edward Scissorhands or The Corpse Bride, but I hope to in the future.

    Needless to say, I am a big fan of Tim Burton.

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